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Case Study: The Effectiveness of a Dietary Supplement Regimen in Reducing Igg-Mediated Food Sensitivity in ADHD

Barry W. Ritz, MS, Richard S. Lord, PhD

Abstract
Immunologic response to allergens varies depending on the level of exposure. Low-exposure antigens, such as house dust and pollen, trigger immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody recognition, which results in histamine release and a cascade of immunologic events designed to sequester and destroy the antigen. On some occasions, these events, cumulatively termed a type I reaction, can escalate to the severity of anaphylaxis and death. In contrast, relatively high-exposure antigens, including molds and certain occupational exposures and food proteins that pass through a damaged mucosa, generally result in a mixture of immunoglobulin activity in which the immunoglobulin G (IgG) response supercedes the IgE-histamine response.1 IgE may participate by increasing mucosal permeability to facilitate antigen-antibody interaction. In the case of food antigen exposure, increased intestinal hyperpermeability results in the influx of additional antigenic food proteins, such as wheat or casein from milk. In this type of high-exposure immune reaction, classified as type III, IgG forms immune complexes with the antigen for removal by macrophages and the temperature-sensitive enzyme system called complement.1 When these exposures occur chronically, whereby macrophages become saturated or complement is unable to prevent the formation of large immune complexes, these complexes can circulate and contribute to systemic inflammation over a period of time.2 As a result, IgG-mediated exposure to food antigens represents a delayed immune response that may form the basis for adverse food sensitivities not classified as IgE-mediated allergies and may play a role in chronic or autoimmune disease progression.

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